Skip to Content

Bachelor of Science (Medical Biophysics)

This course has been discontinued - this course is closed for new enrolments, the information on this page is provided for continuing students.

Search for 'Bachelor of Science (Medical Biophysics)' in course search.

  • This information is for local students.
  • View course information for international students.
    Am I a You are a local student if:
    you are an Australian citizen, or
    you are a New Zealand citizen (excluding TAFE courses), or
    you are an Australian permanent resident.
    You are an international student if:
    you are not an Australian citizen, and
    you are not a New Zealand citizen (excluding TAFE courses), and
    you are not an Australian permanent resident.
    local or an international student
    ?
Note: There will be no intake into this program for students commencing in Semester 1 2014 and onwards. Please refer to the new Bachelor of Science program for entry requirements, application process and course structure details.
This course structure is for students commencing in 2010.
This high-calibre science program brings together physics, technology and physiology to examine and analyse biological process of the human body. It specifically focuses on determining system function and explaining this in fundamental terms. This course includes engineering mathematics and medical electronics to enhance understanding of modern monitoring technology, which is then put into the context of human physiology, from cells to systems.
Biophysics prepares students for work in high-demand research, data modelling and analytical areas of hospital departments related to the measurement and analysis of human organ and system functions. This course may also lead to employement as the interface between patients and instrumentation in areas such as medical imaging, neurology, intensive care, theatre, respiratory, and vascular and circulatory system function.
This course is also offered to Australian students through the Vice-Chancellor's Scholarship Program. Successful applicants are awarded HECS-waiver scholarships and will be funded for the duration of their course. For further information visit the Scholarships website.
Duration3 years full-time. An optional and additional year of Industry-Based Learning (IBL) is also available.
Campus and intakes  Calendar
Hawthorn - Semester 1, Semester 2
Study modeFull-time
Part-time (day)
Swinburne course codeBA-SCMBI (formerly Z0416MBI)

On this page: course description, course structure, major specialisations and units of study.

Course description

Note: There will be no intake into this program for students commencing in Semester 1 2014 and onwards. Please refer to the new Bachelor of Science program for entry requirements, application process and course structure details.
This course structure is for students commencing in 2010.
This high-calibre science program brings together physics, technology and physiology to examine and analyse biological process of the human body. It specifically focuses on determining system function and explaining this in fundamental terms. This course includes engineering mathematics and medical electronics to enhance understanding of modern monitoring technology, which is then put into the context of human physiology, from cells to systems.
Biophysics prepares students for work in high-demand research, data modelling and analytical areas of hospital departments related to the measurement and analysis of human organ and system functions. This course may also lead to employement as the interface between patients and instrumentation in areas such as medical imaging, neurology, intensive care, theatre, respiratory, and vascular and circulatory system function.
This course is also offered to Australian students through the Vice-Chancellor's Scholarship Program. Successful applicants are awarded HECS-waiver scholarships and will be funded for the duration of their course. For further information visit the Scholarships website.
Please note that many course codes have changed from 2014.

Course structure

This course will operate under a student workload model based on 100 credit points for a full-time academic year. One credit point is deemed to be equivalent to one hour of student work per week over a semester, whether in contact with staff or in private study. Four units of study, each worth 12.5 credit points, will generally be taken each semester. The typical student's average weekly workload during semester is therefore expected to be fifty hours. Total student contact hours, including lectures, classes, tutorials, flexible learning and laboratory and field sessions will be approximately 16 hours/week during academic semesters.
Students must complete 300 credit points, or 24 units of 12.5 credit points each. These units will comprise of one Professional Major and one Co-Major as follows:

Additionally the following rules apply:
  • the non-credit unit, HAC0001 Careers in the Curriculum, is compulsory; 
  • two (2) Major Project units must be completed as part of the major studies sequence;
  • the same unit cannot be counted more than once. Where there are overlaps, the 300 credit points of study must be made up in the first instance by a Minor where 50 credit points is required, otherwise by freeelectives or Options Plus units;
  • students will normally not be permitted to successfully complete more than 26 units (325cps);
  • Professional Major Coordinators have the authority to approve alternative units if required for students to complete in a timely fashion. To be noted at Faculty Academic Committee.
Careers in the Curriculum (CIC)
In addition to the above, students must complete a compulsory unit of study HAC0001 Careers in the Curriculum to be awarded the degree. Careers in the Curriculum (CIC) is an innovative unit designed to assist Swinburne students to enhance their employability and career prospects. It is usually undertaken in the second year of their course and is compulsory for all undergraduate students. Students studying CIC will not incur a HECS or fee debt as the cost will be met by the university as part of an initiative to enhance students' career skills.

Final Year Experience - Major Projects

As part of the Swinburne Model for Professional Learning, all incoming undergraduates will undertake 25 credit points of professionally focused final year major projects within their programs of study. Entry with advanced standing may require alternate study sequences to be undertaken.

Winter and Summer Term

This program also provides opportunities to undertake study in an optional six-week Winter and Summer term allowing you to complete extra study between the standard semesters.  These terms are not mandatory.  However, if you wish to vary your study load you may want to consider this option.
Options Plus Students will have access to a small set of approved individual Options Plus units of study which provide either a distinctive learning experience or targeted study support. This could include optional study tours, an Intercultural Communications unit, and an ‘introduction to undergraduate research’ unit. In some cases, students may be advised or directed to take specially targeted Options Plus units, for example the Analysing and Writing English unit to be offered for credit in Winter Term for NESB students.

Students undertaking a full 300 cp program are allowed to substitute at least one Options Plus unit for one existing unit within their co-major– but not in their Professional Major. They will be advised by their faculty on which unit(s) of the co-major.
In the case of students who enter with significant levels of advanced standing and whose program is therefore composed only of a Professional Major, the faculty may approve a substitution, or else require the students to undertake the Options Plus unit in addition to their Major studies.

Major specialisations

Study areas in the Bachelor of Science (Medical Biophysics) program include biochemistry, biology, cellular biophysics, respiratory and renal biophysics, cardiovascular biophysics, biotechnology, cellular physiology, chemistry, electronic systems, physics, engineering mathematics, medical imaging, physiological modeling, neuroscience, neurophysiology, physiology and programming.
Professional Majors
A Professional Major (200 credit points or 16 units of study) in Science is designed to provide students with appropriate breadth and depth of knowledge in a particular field of study and provide suitable preparation for professional graduate employment. It may be based on a single, recognised discipline, or it may be inter-disciplinary in character.
Co-majors
A Co-major (100 credit points or 8 units of study) is a sequence of study focused on a specific discipline and is normally self-contained, in that it includes any requisite foundation studies.

On this page: aims and objectives, career opportunities, professional recognition and graduate attributes.

Aims and objectives

Graduates will be able to:
  • undertake advanced research in areas of medical and biomedical technologies
  • participate in research projects at a number of levels from analysis to empirical work
  • contribute to advanced analysis and interpretation of physiological, biophysical and acquired data, as well as be able to model complex physiological systems
  • communicate their findings to a wide range of audiences
  • work in a wide variety of applied aspects of physiology and biophysics
  • gain employment in medical and physiological instrumentation companies
  • work in a wide range of hospital and non-hospital based areas where there is direct and indirect acquisition of physiological information (such as intensive care, theatre, cardiology, respiratory function, neurology and biomedical instrumentation)
  • work in groups or individually and be able to plan and execute long-term projects

Career opportunities

Employment may be found in hospitals and other organisations in roles focused on medical biophysics such as medical imaging specialists, research scientists, physiologists, applications specialists, cardiovascular technologist, respiratory technologist and neuroscientist. There are also opportunities to work in human factors, medical instrumentation companies, and some sports science areas.

Professional recognition

Graduates may be eligible to apply for membership of the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM).

Graduate attributes

Swinburne intends that its teaching programs assist all its graduates to be:
  • Capable in their chosen professional, vocational or study areas
  • Entrepreneurial in contributing to innovation and development within their business, workplace or community
  • Effective and ethical in work and community situations
  • Adaptable and manage change
  • Aware of local and international environments in which they will be contributing (such as sociocultural, economic, natural)

On this page: IBL (industry based learning) and Swinburne Abroad.

Industry learning

Industry-Based Learning (IBL) is an optional program in which students are placed in paid, supervised employment relevant to their studies as part of their degree. IBL gives you practical experience to add to your academic studies and is aimed at increasing a your employability upon graduation. All IBL placements are subject to availability of places. It is not available to international students holding a student visa. For further information visit: www.swinburne.edu.au/lss/ibl

Swinburne Abroad

Swinburne offers International Exchange Programs as well as other Education Abroad Programs to help internationalise your degree. International Exchange is an academic program allowing you to study at a Swinburne Partner Institution for one or two semesters during your degree. Swinburne's Partner Institutions offer many relevant subjects as well as a secure base to explore a different culture. Your studies whilst on exchange can be credited towards your Swinburne degree, provided they are relevant and approved by Swinburne. For further information visit the Swinburne Abroad website.

On this page: entry requirements, credit transfer and recognition of prior learning

Entry requirements

Successful completion of an appropriate Victorian Year 12 or its equivalent.

2013 VCE prerequisites: Units 3 and 4–a study score of at least 30 in English (ESL) or at least 25 in any other English and a study score of at least 20 in Mathematics (any).
 
Selection mode: CY12: ENTER and two-stage process with a middle-band of approximately 20%. 
 
Middle Band: Re-ranking based on mathematics (any), physical education, psychology or science (any).

All Non-Year 12 students (NONY12) should refer to the VTAC website for further infomation.

Credit transfer

Applicants with prior tertiary studies that satisfy part of the academic requirements of this course may be granted ‘credit’ and/or entry into the course with ‘advanced standing’. University policies apply and applicants are assessed on a case-by-case basis. For further information refer to the Credit Transfer website.

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is a process where a student may be granted credit or partial credit towards a qualification in recognition of skills and knowledge gained through work experience, life experience and/or formal training. For further details for students considering Higher Education courses visit the RPL website.

On this page: how to apply, course fees, scholarships and find out more.

How to apply

Please note that this course is closed for new enrolments.

Course fees

For information about Swinburne's fees visit the Fees website.

Find out more